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Amalonzo

Anne-Marie Alonzo. Courtesy Athabasca University.

Anne-Marie Alonzo, CM (December 13, 1951 - June 11, 2005) was a French Canadian poet, playwright, novelist, and literary critic.

LifeEdit

Alonzo was born in Alexandria, Egypt.[1] She immigrated to Quebec when she was 12. In 1966 she was the victim of a car accident, which left her quadriplegic and using a wheelchair.

She earned a B.A in 1976, an M.A. in 1978, and a Ph.D. in French studies in 1989 from the Université de Montréal.[2]

Her work appeared in literary magazines such as La Nouvelle Barre du Jour, Possibles, and Spirale. She published 20 books in her lifetime.[2]

She co-founded Trois magazine and Trois publishing house with Alain Laframboise,[2] and in 1989 launched the Festival littéraire de Trois.[1]

WritingEdit

Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature: "Alonzo's themes are wide-ranging, including mythical visions of an Egypt she barely knows that evoke all the colour and sensuality of the Middle East and much of its cruelty (Bleus de mine, 1985); biblical events (Le livre des ruptures, 1988); images of female love, for her mother, her lover, her friends (Droite et de profil, 1984; Écoute, Sultane, 1987). Her work is also characterized by its theoretical emphasis, its intertextuality, its efforts to erase the limits of the written word and to penetrate other forms of art."[3]

RecognitionEdit

Her collection, Bleus de Mine (Lead Blues), was nominated for the 1985 Governor General's Award for French language poetry.[1]

Blues des Mines won the Emile Nelligan Prize in 1985.[2] Alonzo was the first non-native Quebecois to win the award.[3]

Her novel, Galia qu’elle Nommait Amour, won the Grand Prix d’excellence artistique de Laval in 1992.[2]

In 1996, she was made a Member of the Order of Canada.[1]

She received a bronze medal from the Société Arts-Sciences-Lettres de Paris in 1997.[2]

PublicationsEdit

PoetryEdit

  • Geste. Paris: Des Femmes, 1979.
  • Veilles. Paris: Des Femmes, 1982.
  • Une lettre rouge orange et ocre: texte dramatique. Montréal : Editions de la Pleine lune, 1984.
  • Seul le desir. Outremont, QC: NBJ, 1987.
  • Enfances et jeunesses : textes de Anne-Marie Alonzo. Montréal : Entreprises Radio-Canada, 1988.
  • Droite et de profil. Montreal: Lèvres urbaines, 1984.
  • Blues de mine. Ville St-Laurent, QC: Editions deu Noroit, 1985.
  • Seule le désir. Montreal: NBJ, 1987.
  • Le Livre de ruptures. Montreal: Editions de l’Hexagone, 1988.
  • Margie Gillis, La danse des marches. Montreal: Editions du Noroit, 1993.
  • Tout au loin la lumière. Montreal: Editions du Noroit, 1994.

EnglishEdit

  • Lead Blues (translated by William Donaghue). Montreal: Guernica, 1990.

PlaysEdit

  • Une Letter Rouge, Orange et Ocre. Montreal: Editions de la pleine lune, 1984. dramatic text.

FictionEdit

  • Blance de Thé. Montreal: Les Zeditions élastique, 1983.
  • Ecoute Sultane. Montreal: Editions de l’Hexagone. 1987.
  • Galia qu'elle Nommait Amour. Montreal: Editions Trois, 1992.

Non-fictionEdit

  • Nous en reparlerons sans doute. Laval: Editions Trois, 1986.
  • La Vitesse du regard. Montreal, 1990.
  • Galia marchait pour toutes. Montreal: Trois, 1998.
  • Et la nuit. Montreal: Trois, 2001

EnglishEdit

  • French Conversation. Laval: Editions Trois, 1986.

LettersEdit

  • L'Immobile. Montreal: L'Hexagone, 1990. letters
  • Lettres à Cassandre. Montreal: Trois, 1994.


Except where noted, bibliographical information courtesy Athabasca University.[4]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "Fondatrice du Festival de Trois - Décès d'Anne-Marie Alonzo" (in French). Le Devoir. June 14, 2005. http://www.ledevoir.com/culture/livres/84146/fondatrice-du-festival-de-trois-deces-d-anne-marie-alonzo. Retrieved December 15, 2010. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Anne-Marie Alonzo, French-Canadian Writers], Athabasca University. Web, Mar. 26, 2017.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Anne-Marie Alonzo, Oxford Companion to Canadian Literature, Oxford University Press, 2001. Answers.com, Web, Apr. 18, 2014.
  4. Bibliography of Works by Ann-Marie Alonzo, French-Canadian Writers, Athabasca University. Web, Apr. 18, 2014.

External linksEdit

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