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Charles-T.-Brooks

Charles T. Brooks (1813-1883), from Poems: Original and translated, 1885. Courtesy Internet Archive.

Rev. Charles Timothy Brooks (June 20, 1813 - June 14, 1883) was an American poet and translator of German works. He was philosophically a Transcendentalist and a Unitarian pastor.

LifeEdit

Ctbrookspainting

Charles Timothy Brooks. Portrait by Sarah Hammond Palfrey (1823-1914), circa 1878.

Brooks was born in Salem, Massachusetts. He graduated from Harvard University in 1832 and Harvard Divinity School in 1835.<[1] In 1835 he began to preach in Nahant, Massachusetts, and served as a preacher in various New England towns. On June 4, 1837, he became pastor of the Unitarian church in Newport, Rhode Island, where he remained until his death in 1883.

In addition to his translations, he published theological writings, contributed to The Dial, a transcendentalist publication, and wrote a biography of William Ellery Channing, another Unitarian minister in Newport (William Ellery Channing: A Centennial Memory, 1880).[2]

According to Appleton's Encyclopedia, several of Brooks' works remained unpublished years after his death:

Among his unpublished translations are Schiller's "Mary Stuart" and "Joan of Arc" (1840): the "Autobiography of Klaus Harms"; Richter's "Selina"; Grillparzer's "Ahn-frau"; Immermann's "Der letzte Tulifant," and Hams Sachs's play, "The Unlike Children of Eve," first acted in 1553.
In 1853, after a voyage to India for his health, Brooks wrote a narrative titled Eight Months on the Ocean and Eight Weeks in India, which is also still in manuscript.

PublicationsEdit

PoetryEdit

ProseEdit

TranslatedEdit

Children's booksEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Charles Timothy Brooks biography, Dictionary of Literary Biography (Thomson-Gale, 2005-2006), Thomson Corp. Web, Jan. 15, 2013.
  2. [1] Web page titled "Charles Timothy Brooks"
  3. A Poem Pronounced before the Phi Beta Kappa Society, August 28, 1845, Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  4. Songs of Field and Flood (1853), Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  5. Roman Rhymes: Being winter work for a summer fair (1869), Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  6. Poems (1885), Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  7. The Controversy touching the Old Stone Mill (1851), Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  8. The Simplicity of Christ's Teachings: Set forth in sermons (1859), Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  9. William Ellery Channing: A centennial memory (1880), Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  10. Songs and Ballads from the German, Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  11. German Lyric Poetry: A collection of songs and ballads, Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  12. Homage of the Arts, Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  13. German Lyrics (1853), Internet Archive. Web, Jan. 15, 2013.
  14. The Jobsiad: The life, opinions, actions, and fate of Hieronymus Jobs, the candidate, Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  15. Hesperus; or, Forty-five dog-post days, Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  16. The Layman's Breviary: or, Meditations for every day in the year, Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  17. The World-Priest, Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.
  18. The Wisdom of the Brahmin: A didactic poem, Internet Archive. Web, July 13, 2013.

External linksEdit

Poems
Books
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