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Elizabeth Akers Allen (1832-1911). Courtesy Maine Women Writers Collection.

Elizabeth Chase Akers Allen (October 9, 1832 – August 7, 1911) was an American poet and journalist.[1]

LifeEdit

Born Elizabeth Anne Chase in Strong, Maine, she grew up in Farmington, Maine, where she attended Farmington Academy. She began to write at the age of fifteen, under the pen name Florence Percy, and in 1855 published under that name a volume of poems entitled Forest Buds. In 1851 she married Marshall S.M. Taylor, but they were divorced within a few years.

In subsequent years she travelled through Europe; in Rome she became acquainted with the feminist Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis. While in Europe she served as a correspondent for the Portland Transcript and the Boston Evening Gazette. She started contributing to the Atlantic Monthly in 1858[1]

She married Paul Akers, a Maine sculptor whom she had met in Rome, in August 1860; he died in 1861. In 1865 she married Elijah M. Allen, of New York.[1] In 1866 a collection of her poems was published in Boston by Ticknor & Fields.

She died in Tuckahoe, New York, in 1911.

WritingEdit

The poem for which she is best remembered is "Rock Me to Sleep, Mother" (1882), which begins:

          Backward, turn backward, O time, in thy flight;
          Make me a child again, just for to-night.

PublicationsEdit

Short fictionEdit

JuvenileEdit

  • Brothers and Sisters: Short stories for little men and little maidens. Young Folks, 1891.


Except where noted, bibliographical information courtesy WorldCat.[3]

See also Edit

Rock Me to Sleep by Elizabeth Chase Akers Allen Poem

Rock Me to Sleep by Elizabeth Chase Akers Allen Poem

References Edit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Elizabeth Ann Chase Akers Allen, Encyclopædia Britannica, Encyclopædia Britannica Inc. Web, June 26, 2013.
  2. The High-Top Sweeting, and other poems (1891), Internet Archive. Web, June 26, 2013.
  3. Search results = au:Elizabeth Akers Allen, WorldCat, OCLC Online Computer Library Center Inc. Web, Mar. 23, 2018.

External linksEdit

Poems
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