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Ellery Akers

Ellery Akers. Courtesy ElleryAkers.com.

Ellery Akers (born 1946) is an American poet, children's writer, artist, and naturalist.

LifeEdit

Akers attended Radcliffe College at Harvard University, where she was an editor of The Advocate, and where she earned a B.A. in 1967. She took postraduate studies at San Francisco State University, earnng an M.A. in 1974.[1]

Akers lives on the coast of Northern California.[1] She is the author of a collection of poems, Knocking on the Earth (1989),[2] and an illustrated children's novel, Sarah's Waterfall: A Healing Story About Sexual Abuse (2009).[3]

Her poetry has been featured on National Public Radio, and has appeared in the American Poetry Review,[4] Harvard Magazine,[5] Ploughshares,[6] The Sun,[7] and many other magazines. Her nature essays have been included in numerous magazines and anthologies, and her play, Letters to Anna: 1846-54, won a Dominican University One Act Play Festival Award in 2003.[5]

Akers has taught at Cabrillo College and been on the faculty at writer's conferences at Squaw Valley, Skyline College, and Humboldt State University.[5]

RecognitionEdit

Akers has won 9 national awards for writing, including the John Masefield Award, the Paumanok Award, the Gordon Barber Award, and Sierra magazine's Nature Writing Award.[1]

Akers has exhibited her artwork in a number of galleries and museums in the United States, and her fellowships include writing residencies at Ucross Foundation,[8] Blue Mountain Center, the MacDowell Colony, and Headlands Center for the Arts.[5]

PublicationsEdit

PoetryEdit

JuvenileEdit

  • Sarah's Waterfall: A healing story about sexual abuse. Brandon, VT: Safer Society Press, 2009.


Except where noted, bibliographical information courtesy WorldCat.[9]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

Poems
Books
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