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by George J. Dance

Bartlett

Gertrude Bartlett in Canadian Poets, 1916. Courtesy University of Rochester.

Gertrude Bartlett
Born April 11, 1868
New Haven, New York
Died September 27, 1942
Montreal, Quebec
Nationality Canada Canadian
Spouse(s) John W.C. Taylor

Gertrude Emilie Bartlett (April 11, 1868 - September 27, 1942) was a Canadian poet.[1]

LifeEdit

Bartlett was born in New Haven, New York, to Mary (Moulton) and William Cheever Bartlett. She came to Montreal at 17 and found work in Macdonald and Marsh, the law firm of Sir John A. Macdonald.[2]

At 18 she began writing poetry, which she frequently had published in periodicals.[1]

In 1891 she married English artist John W.C. Taylor, and spent a year in England. The couple had a daughter.[2]

The family lived in Montreal, where Taylor became president of the Montreal Lithographic Company. Bartlett was a frequent contributor of stories and poems to the Montreal Gazette.[1]

She was a friend of Katherine Hale.[1]

RecognitionEdit

Although Bartlett had not published a book of poetry at the time, John Garvin included 4 of her poems in his 1916 anthology, Canadian Poets.[2]

Her poem "The White Bird" won Quebec's Prix David (section anglaise) in 1932.[1]

Her sonnet "The Bride" won the Montreal Poetry Contest of the Canadian Authors Association in 1934.[1]

PublicationsEdit

  • The White Bird, and other poems. Toronto: Macmillan, 1932.[3]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Taylor, Gertrude Bartlett, Canada's Early Women Writers, Simon Fraser Univerity. Web, Mar. 27, 2017.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 John Garvin, "Gertrude Bartlett," Canadian Poets, Toronto: McClelland, Goodchild & Stewart, 1916, 395-398. Digital Library, University of Pennyslvania, UPenn.edu, Web, Feb. 18, 2012.
  3. Search results = au:Gertrude Emilie Bartlett Taylor, WorldCat, OCLC Online Computer Library Center Inc. Web, Mar. 27, 2017.

External linksEdit

Poems
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