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Cockaday & bannerman

Laurence M. Cockaday (1894-1986) & Kendall Banning (1879-1944), circa 1924. Courtesy Pinterest.

Kendall Banning (1879-1944) was an American poet and magazine editor.[1]

LifeEdit

Banning was a World War I veteran, the author of over a dozen books (including books on Annapolis and West Point), and an editor of Cosmopolitan, Popular Radio, and Hearst Magazine.[1]

During the 1929 debate on revising the tariff legislation that allowed United States customs inspectors to ban and seize imported books they deemed "obscene", Banning reprinted his 1926 Censored Mother Goose Rhymes – the traditional rhymes with words blacked out to suggest obscenity, which he dedicated to "the censors of America" – and had it distributed to members of Congress.[1] Gertrude Stein owned a copy of the 1929 edition.[2]

WritingEdit

A 1913 New York Times review said of Banning that "no other poet in America at the moment has such a gift of pure melody."[1]

PublicationsEdit

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PoetryEdit

PlayEdit

  • ""Copy": A one-act newspaper play, based upon an actual occurrence in the city news room of a metropolitan daily at the time a big "story" came over the wires (adapted from the story by Harold Kellock). Chicago: Clinic, 1910;
    • also published as Copy: A drama in one act. New York: Longmans Green, 1924.

Non-fictionEdit

  • The Squire's Recipes. Chicago: Brothers of the Book, 1912.
  • West Point Today. New York & London: Funk & Wagnalls, 1937.
  • Annapolis Today. New York & London: Funk & Wagnalls, 1938;
    • revised edition, Annapolis, MD: United States Naval Institute, 1957.
  • The Fleet Today. New York & London: Funk & Wagnalls, 1940.
  • Submarine! The story of undersea fighters. New York: Random House, 1942.
  • Our Army Today. New York & London: Funk & Wagnalls, 1943.

EditedEdit


Except where noted, bibliographical information courtesy WorldCat.[3]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Censored Mother Goose Rhymes (1929) by Kendall Banning, Austin Kleon, Tumblr, December 3, 2011. Web, May 22, 2015.
  2. Ulla E. Dydo, Gertrude Stein: The language that rises, 1923-1934 (Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2003), 428, note 33. Google Books, Web, May 22, 2015.
  3. Search results = au:Kendall Banning, WorldCat, OCLC Online Computer Library Center Inc. Web, May 22, 2015.

External linksEdit

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