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A monograph is a specialist work of writing on a single subject or an aspect of a subject, usually by a single author.

DefinitionsEdit

Monograph (monograph), n. Mon"o*graph [Mono- + -graph.]

  1. A written account or description of a single thing, or class of things; a special treatise on a particular subject of limited range.

Monographer (monographer), n. Mo*nog"ra*pher

  1. A writer of a monograph.

Monographic (monographic), a. Mon`o*graph"ic [Cf. F. monographique.]

  1. Of or pertaining to a monograph, or to a monography; as, a monographic writing; a monographic picture.

Mon`o*graph"ic*al*ly, adv.

Monographist (monographist), n. Mo*nog"ra*phist

  1. One who writes a monograph.

Monographous (monographous), a. Mo*nog"ra*phous

  1. Monographic. [Obs.]

Monography (monography), n. Mo*nog"ra*phy [Mono- + -graphy: cf. F. monographie.]

  1. Representation by lines without color; an outline drawing.
  2. A monograph.[1]

AboutEdit

The term dates from the 19th century and is taken from the Latin monographia, meaning 'writing on a single subject'.[2] Unlike a textbook, which surveys the state of knowledge in a field, the main purpose of a monograph is to present primary research and original scholarship. This research is presented at length, distinguishing a monograph from an article. For these reasons, publication of a monograph is commonly regarded as vital for career progression in many academic disciplines. Intended for other researchers and bought primarily by libraries, monographs are generally published as individual volumes in a short print run.[3] Librarians consider a monograph to be a nonserial publication complete in one volume (book) or a finite number of volumes. Thus it differs from a serial publication such as a magazine, journal, or newspaper.[4]

Book publishers use the term "artist monograph" to indicate books consisting of reproductions of works of art by a single artist, as opposed to surveys of art from multiple artists.

Other UsagesEdit

Taxonomy (systematic biology) Edit

In biological taxonomy a monograph is a comprehensive treatment of a taxon. Monographs typically revise all known species within a group, add any newly discovered species, and collect and synthesize available information on the ecological associations, geographic distributions, and morphological variations within the group. Example: Lent & Wygodzinsky, 1979, Revision of the Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae), and their significance as vectors of Chagas' disease. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History v. 163, article 3, pp. 125-520.[5]

The first ever monograph of a plant taxon was Robert Morison's 1672 Plantarum Umbelliferarum Distributio Nova, a treatment of the Apiaceae.[6]

United States Food and Drug Administration regulation Edit

In the context of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation, monographs represent published standards by which the use of one or more substances is automatically authorized. For example, the following is an excerpt from the Federal Register: "The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule in the form of a final monograph establishing conditions under which over-the-counter (OTC) sunscreen drug products are generally recognized as safe and effectiveand not misbranded as part of FDA's ongoing review of OTC drug products."[7] Such usage has given rise to the use of the word monograph as a verb, as in "this substance has been monographed by the FDA".

See also: pharmacopoeia.

See alsoEdit

References Edit

  1. Monograph," Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1903). MShaffer.com, Web, Oct. 30, 2012.
  2. Oxford Dictionaries Online, Definition of 'Monograph'
  3. The Role and Future of the Monograph in Arts and Humanities Research (University College, London)
  4. Prytherch, Raymond John, Harrod's librarians' glossary and reference book : a directory of over 10,200 terms, organizations, projects and acronyms in the areas of information management, library science, publishing and archive management, 10th edn (Aldershot, Hants, England ; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2005), p. 462.
  5. http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/dspace/handle/2246/1282
  6. Vines, Sydney Howard (1913). "Robert Morison 1620—1683 and John Ray 1627—1705". In Oliver, Francis Wall (ed.). Makers of British Botany. Cambridge University Press. p. 22. 
  7. [Federal Register: May 21, 1999 (Volume 64, Number 98)][Rules and Regulations] [Page 27666-27693]From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov][DOCID:fr21my99-6]

External linksEdit

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