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by George J. Dance

Bauer bill

William Bauer (1992-2010). Photo by Brian Bartlett. Courtesy New Brunswick Literary Encyclopedia.

William Alfred "Bill" Bauer (May 10, 1932 - June 12, 2010) was a U.S.-born Canadian poet and academic.[1]

LifeEdit

Bauer was born in Portland, Maine, to Virginia and Alfred Bauer. He grew up in Auburn, Maine.[1]

He attended Amherst College, where he earned a B.A. in psychology, and then Wesleyan University in Connecticut, where he earned an M.A. and a teaching degree. At Wesleyan in 1953 he met his future wife, Nancy Luke, whom he married in 1956.[1] [2]


The Bauers moved to Texas in 1956, but returned to Connecticut in 1958. In 1961 Bauer entered the University of North Carolina, where he earned a Ph.D.[1]

The Bauer family moved to Fredericton, New Brunswick in 1965, and Barr became a professor of English at the University of New Brunswick (UNB), a position he held until his retirement in 1994.[1]

PublicationsEdit

PoetryEdit

  • Cornet Music for Plupy Shute. Fredericton, NB: New Brunswick Poetry Chapbooks, 1968.
  • Everett Coogler. Fredericton, NB: New Brunswick Poetry Chapbooks, 1971.
  • The Terrible Word. Fredericton, NB: Fiddlehead Poetry Books, 1978.
  • Unsnarling String. Fredericton, NB: Fiddlehead Poetry Books, 1983.

Short fictionEdit


Except where noted, bibliographical information courtesy the New Brunswick Literary Encyclopedia.[1]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Eric Kortschak, William Alfred Bauer, New Brunswick Literary Encyclopedia, St. Thomas University, STU.ca, Web, June 29, 2012.
  2. Shawn Gallant, Nancy Bauer, New Brunswick Literary Encyclopedia, St. Thomas University, STU.ca, Web, June 29, 2012.

External linksEdit

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